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'll be back at 7:00 eastern time, thank you for joining us. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] >>. what's in 2007, analysts meredith whitney was the first to predict major losses for citigroup. she said -- our guest tonight on c-span's q&a. >> next, a discussion on the image of muslims in the u.s.. some of the topics are the controversy over the proposed islamic center near ground zero in york city. it is an hour and half. >> we welcome you to our briefing. and we have a distinguished panel year before you to talk about -- we call it a discussion. i want to be clear that this briefing is not about park 51. none of the panelists here are experts on the project or connected directly. this is not about park 51. the congressional muslim the staff association does not necessarily endorse the positions of the panelists here. we want to bring together experts and community leaders to talk about conversations in the wake of this controversy that is taking place all across america. it is a complex conversation that we're having right now. the muslim staff association represents a
. his goal was to work until he was 80. from the two of us putting down the river, i said, [laughter] my brother, john and i had a rare privilege coming up. it we followed our father to the citadel and john is a graduate of the citadel mighting 79 and myself of 1980. he went on to the dental corps as a dentist. we transferred to the jag cora and i have been on active duty several times. my status as a veteran has been extremely helpful in my committee assignments to serve you and the nation in congress. it is really unfortunate that there are not as many veterans that serve in congress today. there are probably less than 20 of us that have served in a theatre of war and is pretty stunning. not long ago, i was able to say to john dingell that i do in the in that if god had given me the choice in military or congress, i would have chosen to serve in the congress where members have served in world war ii and korea. they understood the american character. they understood a character that was formed and forced out of the course also very difficult times, and they were task through time to act
." join us with your calls, e- mail's end tweets next sunday at noon eastern on c-span3 book tv. >> now, the washington institute for near east policy post a discussion on leadership of the oilseeds of saddam hussein. documents were captured in iraq in 2003 and provided scholars with an inside view of the iraqi regime _ sought -- saddam hussein's leadership. they have archived the materials. this is about 1.5 hours. >> good afternoon ladies and gentleman. my name is michael eisenstaedt. i am a senior fellow and director of the studies program at the washington institute of near east policy. almost three years to the day this week marks the start of the iraq war. it led to a series of events in a bloody eight year war between iran and iraq which contributed to the 1991 gulf war which in turn set up a decade of sanctions and containment of iraq followed by the 2003 invasion of iraq by the united states and its coalition partners which leads us to where we are today. one of the consequences of the invasion of iraq was that the united states government's possession of massive numbers of gov
tougher on foreign policy. host: joan joins us from tennessee, an independent caller. caller: i am 65 years old, and i was one of the protestors of the vietnam war, marched, but of course, with age comes wisdom, and at this point, i really appreciate what president johnson was up against. even though i did not vote for him, because i don't vote, that's not cyniyism, i did vote once for the son of nancy pelosi. i think that lyndon johnson is one of the great presidents because of what he did in passing the civil rights act. he did that, even though you knew that it would cost the democratic party the white south, but he did it based on moral reasons, because he really wanted to perfect the constitution, and that passing the voting rights act, even though it would cost the democratic party the white south, he did it because it was the right thing. guest: that is such an important point, and i really congratulate you, culler, because i think nothing is more important to understand the great side of lyndon johnson than that the courage it took. he knew that it was going to cost him the so
for americans, and find enough support in this body and the congress. it is very important to us, as a country, that we do not leave those markets to our competitors. >> it would be your opinion that the ratification of those agreements would create jobs? >> we have to make sure that we have agreements in place that provide a good deal for american businesses and american workers. where we have strong agreements that meet that test, it will be important for us to make them law. >> with the basel discussion on the capital standards, i want to ask about capital formation. the financial reform bill changed the net worth test for meeting the accredited investors standard. did you support those changes, believing that altering the standards will impact the ability to raise capital and take companies public? >> you are testing my memory of the origin of that provision. i would be happy to look at it in more detail and come back to you. my general view, and i think it is supported by how the broader investment community reacted, is that this will provide a better system for companies to go raise capi
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5

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